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OVERVIEW RHINOPLASTY CHIN RESHAPING CHEEK ENHANCEMENT FACIAL IMPLANTS LIP ENHANCEMENT EAR RESHAPING
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PREPARING FOR SURGERY

Who Is a Candidate?

Children who are good candidates for ear surgery are:

  • Healthy, without a life-threatening illness or untreated chronic ear infections
  • Generally 5 years old, or when a child’s ear cartilage is stable enough for correction
  • Cooperative and follow instructions well
  • Able to communicate their feelings and do not voice objections when surgery is discussed

Teenagers and adults who are good candidates for ear surgery are:

  • Healthy individuals who do not have a life-threatening illness or medical conditions that can impair healing
  • Non-smokers
  • Individuals with a positive outlook and specific goals in mind for ear surgery

Because every case is unique, the only way to accurately determine which procedure is best for you is to consult with Dr. Alexander.

For more information about our ear reshaping procedure, please contact us online or call us at We look forward to helping you look your best.

PREPARING FOR SURGERY

Prior to surgery, we will have you:

  • Take certain medications or adjust your current medications
  • Avoid taking aspirin, anti-inflammatory drugs and herbal supplements as they can increase bleeding
  • Stop smoking well in advance of surgery

During a preoperative appointment, usually 1-2 weeks before surgery, we will:

  • Get lab testing or a medical evaluation
  • Tell you what to do on the night before and morning of surgery
  • Discuss the use of anesthesia during your procedure
  • Explain post-operative care and follow-up, and what help you will need after the procedure

INFORMED CONSENT

Pain from the ear surgery is usually minimal. Pain pills are provided, but are usually not required after a couple of days. Significant pain is extremely rare and may be the sign of a serious complication, so your physician should be notified.

The decision to have ear surgery is extremely personal and you’ll have to decide if the benefits will achieve your goals and if the risks and potential complications are acceptable. Your plastic surgeon and/or staff will explain in detail the risks associated with surgery.

We will explain in detail the risks associated with surgery. You will be asked to sign consent forms to ensure that you fully understand the procedure you will undergo and any risks and potential complications.

Some of the risks include:

  • Bleeding (hematoma)
  • Asymmetry
  • Infection
  • Skin contour irregularities
  • Poor wound healing
  • Unfavorable scarring
  • Change in skin sensation
  • Pain, which may persist
  • Skin discoloration/swelling
  • Allergies to tape, suture materials, glues, blood products, topical preparations or injected agents
  • Possibility of revisional surgery, recurrence from breaking sutures
  • Anesthesia risks

COST

A quote will be provided to you after your consult with Dr. Alexander. Cost is always a consideration in elective surgery. We offer patient financing plans, so be sure to ask.

Costs include:

  • Surgeon’s fee
  • Operating Room and Supplies
  • Anesthesia fees
  • Prescriptions for medication
  • Post-surgery garments, and
  • Medical tests

Most health insurance plans will not cover elective surgery, related complications or another surgery to revise the appearance of your ears. Some procedures may be covered by health insurance, particularly when it is performed to relieve medical symptoms or to restore hearing function. Pre-certification is often required for reimbursement or coverage. Be sure to consult with your insurance company in advance of any surgery.

IMPORTANT TERMS TO KNOW

Anesthesia—General: The patient is asleep, requiring that the airway be protected, either by a standard breathing tube, or by a laryngeal mask (LMA), an inflatable mask that goes in the back of the throat but doesn’t go down the trachea. Through the airway, an anesthesiologist gives gases to put the patient asleep. Drugs may also be given through the IV.

Anesthesia—Local: The surgical area is numbed up with an injection, but the patient is awake. Sometimes a patient will be given an oral medication, like Valium, to help with relaxation.

Anesthesia— Sedation (Twilight): The patient is made sleepy with medications given through an IV. The level of sedation can be adjusted, from barely sleepy to very sleepy. Sometimes sedation is given by the surgeon, but most of the time it is administered by an M.D. anesthesiologist.

Antihelical Fold: A fold that is just inside the rim of the ear.

Conchal (CON-chul) Cartilage: The largest and deepest concavity of the external ear.

Constricted Ear: Also called a lop or cup ear, has varying degrees of protrusion, reduced ear circumference, folding or flattening of the upper helical rim, and lowered ear position.

Cryptotia (crip-TOE-shuh): Also called hidden ear, occurs when the upper rim of the ear is buried beneath a fold of scalp secondary to abnormal folding of the upper ear cartilage toward the head. The folding is the reverse of that commonly seen in the protruding ear.

Ear Axis: The main line of ear growth.

Macrotia (ma-CROW-shuh): Overly large ears; a rare condition.

Microtia: (my-CROW-shuh): The most complex congenital ear deformity when the outer ear appears as either a sausage-shaped structure resembling little more than the earlobe, or has more recognizable parts of the concha and tragus or other normal ear features. It may or may not be missing the external auditory or hearing canal. Hearing is impaired to varying degrees.

Otoplasty: A surgical procedure also known as ear surgery to improve the shape, position or proportion of the ear.

Stahl’s Ear: An ear that is distorted in shape due to an abnormal fold of cartilage.






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